NUTS!

Posted: May 12, 2010 in wargames
Tags: , ,

The besieged defenders of Bastogne need three things — bullets, Dorothy Lamour, and some freaking SETUP CODES on the game units.

Look, I get that punching and clipping the counters for a new wargame is going to take some time. That’s fine. That’s wargamer foreplay. And I understand that The Gamers adhere to this kind of severe, post-SPI visual aesthetic that requires they only number one out of every five hexes on their maps, even though it makes setup more difficult. I can even tumble to the joy of taking a long time to set up a wargame as being a kind of jigsaw puzzle for greying Avalon Hill man-boys.

But, shit, fellas … give my 47-year old eyes a break in mix in some setup codes on your units, OK? It’s tough enough getting it up to spend and hour in the garage setting up your game as is … requiring that I hunt down each individual company of the 26th VG by reading the historical designation when a little, colored dot would separate them for me is beyond the pale. I’m not even asking that you go so far as to print set up hexes on your units — I just want something that helps me select units from the tray without having to discern the difference between 26 VG I/78 Sturm SMG Co and 26 VG II/78 Sturm SMG Co by deciphering 4-pt. black text on a grey background.

Setup codes have been around since the 1970s. Check into them.

And before someone says that the historical designations on the units aren’t important, and that I should feel free to ignore them during setup, let me say:

  1. Fuck you.
  2. Historical designations are all that is provided in the setup instructions. Believe me, if the game gave me generic “4-6-7” units I would be a happy camper, but that option is not available.
  3. See #1, above.

More on this game after (if?) I get it set up.

Yes, this is for shameful solo play. In the garage.

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Comments
  1. […] 20 the other night, a low complexity, fast-moving, quasi-desktop-published wargame from upstart Victory Point Games. I’m not greatly interested in Napoleonics, but I’ve been curious about the throwback […]

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